All posts filed under: Storytelling & Public Affairs

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Chipotle – „A Love Story“

A boy has a crush on the girl next door. To conquer her feet, he plans to invite her to the cinema. Unfortunately, he has no money… As an owner of a drink-stand the boy tries to conquer his lack of money by selling more of his fresh made lemonade. Therefore, he distributes corresponding flyers. However he is faced with a moral dilemma: His crush is his main competitor. She also sells lemonade and sees his action as a threat to her business. She starts her own flyer campaign to get her customers back. Then the boy strikes back by expanding his stand and promotion material. So the girl does the same. Over the years the competition continues and the stands develop into two big industrial companies. They both replace the original fresh ingredients with a cheap lemonade flavour which looks like artificial glitter powder. What started as an innocent wish for love evolved into a serious fight by now two unhappy business owners, who still live next to each other. One day the artificial ingredients turn against them. After realising …

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The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists – Fatal Extraction: Australian Mining in Africa

Australian-listed mining companies choose to do their business in Africa for its low social and environmental regulations. Local laws are weak, while penalties for wrongdoing practically don’t exist. However, Australian publicly traded companies are not only linked with corruption, tax avoidance, environmental destruction, but also with serious human rights violations and more than 300 deaths. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) (with support from the Center for Public Integrity and the Pulitzer Center) has collected thousands of corporate documents, including legal complaints, contracts, confidential company emails, community petitions and more to create Fatal Extraction: Australian Mining in Africa, a multimedia storytelling project with horrifying personal stories at its focus. The project is using stunning videos, real audio recordings, maps and traditional text pieces. The format is divided into six greater parts that each expose the detrimental impact of Australian mining companies in 33 African countries. We have witnessed similar social projects (such as the NPR’s A Girl Can Dream) that submerge viewers and readers through strong multimedia content. But Fatal Extraction creates an eye-opening and immersive …

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NPR – A Girl Can Dream

NPR’s staggering drive for a good story is applauding. Apart from producing daily news and cultural programming, NPR has been submerging into the deep waters of storytelling, appropriately celebrating unique and powerful content and individual lives. Its highly successful StoryCorps podcast focuses on giving everyone a chance to share his or her story. The presented stories are often very moving, which at the end of the broadcast transcend our culture’s bewildered sense of humanity. A Girl Can Dream is a poignant and interactive story on children’s education in Afghanistan. It is unusual for girls to even go to school, but those who do dream big and do not shy away from their opinions. Reporter Rebecca Hersher and photographer David Gilkey visit Tanweer School, founded by a former used car salesman in a neighbourhood, which did not have a public school. The story starts off with an honest and heart-warming video of Afghan teens bravely opening up about their ambitions and dreams. It proceeds to a photostory, laying out startling facts and accounts, portraying ambitious young faces. …

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Huffington Post – The Myth of the Ethical Shopper

Ethical shopping has been a widely discussed topic lately – most of us could easily name these “bad” brands that employ children in sweatshops. We engage in various social actions against it, protests, boycotts, campaigns, etc. However, what we have not thought about much is the fact that simple solutions won’t arise just by boycotting sweatshops. Huffington Post’s Highline presents a longform feature The Myth of the Ethical Shopper about the unethical games fashion brands play and the no-rules approaches they use. This immersive read is accompanied with moving illustrations, which also contribute to the intensity of the topic. You won’t find interactivity here, but the content should be an eye-opener.

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The New York Times – Illuminating North Korea

Photographer David Guttenfelder has been to North Korea more than 40 times. Journalists rarely gain access to the unexplored land, and even if they do they do not bring many photos to share with the world. North Korea has not been photographed for more than 60 years. Guttenfelder, a National Geographic Photography Fellow, and his photographs of North Korea over the years provide a new, clear and un-retouched window into the reality of the country. The New York Times’ Illuminating North Korea is a visual and mystifying journey through photographs, video and smoothly combined facts of the North Korean life.

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8 Projects Exploring The Storytelling Potential Of Virtual Reality For Real-World Stories

It seems that after after decades of uncertainty Virtual Reality gets real as a storytelling platform. The enormous sense of presence provided by VR headsets such as Oculus Rift or Samsung’s Gear VR, allows artists to place users inside films, making them explore and witness first-hand real-world events. The potential VR has to stir emotions and create more visceral reactions makes many believe in its power to revolutionize journalism and filmmaking. However, how close is VR from reaching mass-market adoption? Can we think that anytime soon we will be accessing our news through mounted-headsets? While these questions find answers, we brought you a collection of the best VR non-fiction storytelling experiences that have been touring festivals and museums recently. If one of them arrives to your city run, the queue is going to be long! 1. Project Syria With Project Syria, Nonny de la Peña, the godmother of immersive journalism, place users in Aleppo during a rocket blast and in the middle of a refugee camp in Syria. To evoke the feeling of “been there” …

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Land Rover – The Vanishing Game

The interactive online novel “The Vanishing Game” portrays the core value – adventurism – of the Land Rover brand. Automaker Land Rover takes digital storytelling to a whole new level pairing fiction with real life automotive adventure. The Vanishing Game was launched as an interactive version of British author William Boyd’s novel about captivating yet enigmatic driving experience in United Kingdom. As the protagonist drives around in his Land Rover Defender across the country, readers are carried through a very life-like Tumblr page filled with multi-sensory experience: interactive text, videos, backgrounds, sounds and narration. Divided into chapters, these contain embedded links and clickable action words, that either further explain the story in more detail or present videos of Land Rovers connected to the plot. Click on the word “river” and a rumbling Land Rover will present itself wandering through picturesque waterways. When it seems like the interactive content could not be more surprising, some parts of it showcase actual Land Rover owners’ journeys, which were shared as part of the #WellStoried hashtag campaign a few …

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Lexus – L Studio

A storytelling hub forgets cars, documents personal stories many can relate to.  Lexus, together with two more projects (Team One and It Gets Better Project) created a celebrity-driven storytelling hub titled “It Got Better” via its L/Studio broadband entertainment channel. The six-episode docuseries focuses on intimate stories, all concentrated on personal struggles and achievements related to sexual orientation. The well-known actors, musicians and athletes are all part of the LGBT community, in this way signifying Lexus’ continuous support for the LGBT rights. The brand appeals to a wider spectrum of target audience, mainly focusing on the younger generation, who is more likely to value content and creativity rather than traditional means of advertising. Moreover, the choice to hire contrasting actors, that also bring a certain demographic fan base, is thoroughly executed. What differentiates Lexus’ “It Got Better” project from other automotive storytelling campaigns on the market is the hardly noticeable, and therefore not overwhelming, endorsement. Lexus logo is seen in the beginning of each video, however the topic of the stories presented does not have …