All posts tagged: cosmetics storytelling

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Crème de la Mer – Through Their Eyes & #EyesLightUp

Luxury-cream brand La Mer recently introduced two promotional campaigns focused on the consumers to launch its newest eye gel treatment. The first, “Through Their Eyes” consists of short videos titled Illuminating Moments that show high-society stylish couples in New York, Seoul and Paris using La Mer’s newest product. The brand aims at connecting its image with the people who are considered to be trendsetters. For example, the first video of the couples-series features American socialite Olivia Palermo and her German husband Johannes Huebl. They apply the new La Mer eye gel and gaze endlessly in to each other’s eyes. Although an emotional appeal is aimed to be triggered, the videos lack a representation of reality. Consumers can watch the videos on the brand’s website, as well as on YouTube. La Mer, owned by Estée Lauder Cos., has been spotlighting its products (which are, let’s face it, not affordable to every consumer group) and how they can make a difference, therefore appealing to consumers. The second campaign for the new product manages just what the first one does …

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Maybelline New York – Big Eyes

How can a company make mascara look interesting, inspiring and different? By creating an appealing story behind it and telling it in a unique way that will also reflect the best features of a product.  Labelled “Big Eyes”, the double-ended Maybelline mascara is equipped with two brushes, aimed at creating eyelashes that look fake, but are actually real. Although Maybelline called themselves pioneers of this beauty technology, the brand needed a compelling story behind it that would reflect the mascara’s unique features, and, therefore, intrigue and persuade its potential consumers. Maybelline’s strategy was based on creating content, and the more of it the better. First of, a two-sided mini thriller film “The Girl with The Big Eyes” was created, focusing on ‘him’ and her’ perspective and their spy hunt after each other. The male spy starts off his side of the story, but soon enough we see the female perspective and a hint of her ‘secret weapon’, which is, of course, the new breakthrough mascara. The film is styled resembling New York City in the …

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Burt’s Bees – Six Seconds Classics

It is true that every good brand deserves to tell its great story. What story does a brand started by a quirky beekeeper tell? You got it, an even quirkier one. Burt’s Bees is an American personal care brand, specializing in personal care, beauty, health and personal hygiene and doing it all under the motto “Earth friendly, Natural Personal Care Company”. The brand originated in 1984 between Roxanne Quimby and Burt Shavitz, who were making candles in an abandoned schoolhouse they were renting for $150 a year. What got them into the personal care products industry were Burt’s 19th-century books about bee-keeping and home-made personal care. No wonder that the brand’s liking for books was a great choice to pivot on classic literature stories for their Six Seconds Classics Vine campaign. The ten stop animation films feature tubes of lip balm dressed in costumes and portraying classical fiction characters such as Moby Dick, Gulliver’s Travels and Little Women. Burt’s Bees’ “classic” products were used for the films, and accordingly fit the theme of classic books. For …

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La Roche-Posay – brand website

You might walk pass the beauty isle and overlook the French cosmetics company La Roche-Posay. What you can’t overlook is the brand’s high-quality content website, full of expert tips in helping you achieve a healthy and beautiful skin.   The brand, owned by L’Oreal, uses storytelling in a very subtle and communicative way. It takes a step further by aiming at not only raising awareness of its products, but also educating its (potential) customers about skin damage, proper cleansing and how to choose the products their skin needs. La Roche-Posay tells stories that deal with solutions to problems. Say, for example, you have hyper-sensitive skin and need dermatological advise sparing the trip to the doctor’s office. You go on a cosmetics company website, but all you get are bleak product descriptions, all aimed at forcing you make a purchase. As a customer in need of advice, you are most certainly unsatisfied. La Roche-Posay is less about the product and more about the people. The website is filled with expert tips, question-answer segments and how-to’s by experts-dermatologists, and …